Monday, June 27, 2011

Summary of posts

Here is a summary from my blog of the posts for May and June. In June we developed a prototype "Shout-O-Meter" to measure the decibels during a Primitive Methodist shout during a prayer meeting.

I am continuing to work on my book "Turning the World Upside Down - lessons from the Primitive Methodist movement". I'm getting initial estimates from printers.

Shout-O-Meter The first prototype to measure spiritual effectiveness (just for fun)!

How does your garden grow? A brief overview of two methods of growth - budding and offshoots

Multiplication by budding - as used in the "Branch" system

Method 2: Multiplication by offshoots (seedlings) - as used in Circuit Missions

Multiplication by seeds

It is more blessed to give than to receive - quotations from rich philanthropists

Jubilee Church celebrations - reflections on Chewton Jubilee Church 150 year anniversary

On this day ... two hundred years ago the first membership tickets were issued

On this day … two hundred years ago in May 1811, Hugh Bourne’s Camp Meeting Methodists and William Clowes’ group (the Clowesites) join forces

What’s in a name? There may be two names for a movement. One they choose and another chosen by outsiders

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Multiplication by seeds



The second method of geographical extension is that of multiplication by seeds (or offshoots). The analogy here is that of a seed being blown by the wind to a distant location and takes root. The wind blown seed takes root because the destination environment is favourable. Sometimes a seed will land in an unexpected place.

This method was used by the Primitive Methodist Circuits to start missions in distant locations. The Hull circuit in the north east of England started missions in Kent, Bedford, Hertfordshire, Cornwall, and two missions to London. Overseas mission began in 1829 just two decades after the first official class started in 1810 with ten members.


Table: Circuit missions (seed multiplication)

Related posts

1. Multiplication by budding
2. Multiplication by offshoots (seedlings)
3. History of the Primitive Methodist Connexion, Kendal, page 22

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Method 2: Multiplication by offshoots (seedlings)



The second method of geographical extension is that of multiplication by offshoots. The analogy here is that of a seed being blown by the wind to a distant location and takes root. The wind blown seed takes root because the destination environment is favourable. Sometimes a seed will land in an unexpected place.

This method was used by the Primitive Methodist Circuits to start missions in distant locations. So for example, the Hull circuit in the north east of England started a mission in Cornwall in the far south west of England.


“In 1825 [William] Clowes entered Cornwall as the first Primitive Methodist Missionary, in response to a request from Mr. Turner, who …had been working on Primitive Methodist lines though unattached to any religious community. Beginning under such favourable circumstances, the Cornish mission made progress and soon extended itself into Devonshire.”



Related posts



  1. Multiplication by budding

  2. History of the Primitive Methodist Connexion, Kendal, page 22

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Multiplication by budding



The "Branch" system was a form of multiplication by budding. The Primitive Methodist historian H. B. Kendall notes that



The Home Branch, as it was called, exercised rights of jurisdiction and government over the most distant branch, while for local purposes that branch had all the rights of initiative and independence …

This system ensured the certainty of competent advisers being available for every emergency - of financial help when required - and of the constant supply and frequent interchange of suitable preachers. Then when the branch had proved itself
capable of self-government, it was let go with a blessing.

Thus William Clowes records that in March, 1826, “it was ascertained that from the fruitful mother, Hull, twenty-one circuits had been made, with 8,455 members; and that with the venerable parent there remained 3,541; consequently, from January 12, 1819, the day when I began the Hull mission, a period of seven years and two months, the Hull circuit alone had raised up in the Primitive Methodist Connexion 11,996 souls! Hosannah! Hosannah!”


Next post: Multiplication by offshoots

Related links



  1. http://www.botany.hawaii.edu/faculty/wong/bot135/lect03_b.htm


  2. Multiplication by budding


  3. History of the Primitive Methodist Connexion, Kendal, page 21

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

How does your garden grow?

As a movement grows, patterns begin to emerge. For the Primitive Methodist movement two patterns of multiplication were identified from the natural world. These patterns characterised geographical extension of the early years.

The first was called multiplication by budding based on the biology of yeast cell propagation.

The second was multiplication by seedlings, based on the idea of a seed being caught by the wind and blown to a distant location.


Method 1: Multiplication by budding



A yeast cell multiplies by a process known as budding as shown in the diagram above.

A yeast cell that is about to bud has a predetermined area of the cell that becomes blown out forming a new cell, the so-called bud. (a)
The nucleus will divide with one nucleus migrating into the new cell. (b)

When the new cell is approximately the size of the original cell, the cells will seal off the opening and separate, giving rise to two yeast cells. (c)

The emphasis on this form of multiplication is that of geographical proximity and control whilst the new cell forms. The parent cell provides supervisory control over the child cell until it gets to a level of maturity.

Next post: The Branch System - Multiplication by budding

Related links



  1. http://www.botany.hawaii.edu/faculty/wong/bot135/lect03_b.htm


  2. Multiplication by offshoots

Monday, June 6, 2011

It is more blessed to give than to receive

Here are some quotations on the practical benefit of giving (philanthropy) from the Business Day section of The Saturday Age June 4 2011.


I’ve worked in an economy that rewards someone who saves the lives of others on a battlefield with a medal, rewards a great teacher with thank-you notes from parents, but rewards those who can detect the mispricing of securities with sums reaching into the billions. (Warren Buffett)


Making a difference in people’s lives – and seeing it with your own eyes – is perhaps the most satisfying thing you’ll ever do. If you want to enjoy life – give. (Michael Bloomberg)


We have been blessed with good fortune beyond our wildest expectations, and we are profoundly grateful. But just as these gifts are great, so we feel a great responsibility to use them well. (Melinda and Bill Gates)


I cannot think of a more personally rewarding and appropriate use of wealth than to give while one is living – to personally devote oneself to meaningful efforts to improve the human condition. (Chuck Feeney)